Pediatrics Recertification

MOCA Means MORE Questions

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Tuesday, 07 March 2017. Posted in Pediatrics Recertification

In our previous blog “Be a Beta MOCA” we informed you that the MOCA for earning Part 3 credit had arrived. In this blog we will review the details of this pilot and what you get out of enrolling in the program.

If you are due to take the Exam in December of 2017 and have not signed up for the MOCA group yet, you will have to take the actual exam, at a Prometric Center in 2017. The chance to sign up passed already in October.

Above: How I feel knowing I missed my chance to sign up and not have to take a secured exam

Whenever you opt into the MOCA Group during the year you are due to take the exam in December, the exam gets delayed by a year.

What is the MOCA process? You are sent 20 questions to answer every 3 months. These questions are based on 40 topics which are available on the ABP website.

The Months are Long but the Minutes are Short

The days are long but the years are short. Well here the months are long but the minutes are short. What does that mean? Well you have 3 months to answer the questions but you will be given 5 minutes to answer the question. That is 5 minutes to look it up, call your friends or just answer it. If you start the question and log off you get the question wrong.

You will need to get a majority of the questions correct just as you would on the Part 3 Electronic Prometric exam.

So what if you successfully get the majority of the questions answered correctly, are you done?

Of course not! For one thing this is just in the experimental stage. The only reward you get for now is a postponement of the Prometric® proctored examination.

Above: How I feel knowing the exam is just postponed using MOCA

Where is this Going?

The following year, you will have the same choice again. Take the proctored exam or take the 20 questions per quarter route. If you accept the latter, your due date for the proctored exam gets pushed up yet another year to 2019.

At one point, once this is all settled the ABP will determine if MOCA will replace the Electronic Secured Prometric exam

Once the prometric is phased out, instead of taking an exam once every 10 years you will have to answer the 20 questions a quarter. If you take out your calculator that means you are answering 80 questions a year, instead of 200 questions in one sitting, every 10 years.

Completion of QOW and Possible Glitches

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Wednesday, 22 February 2017. Posted in Maintenance of Certification (MOC), Pediatrics Recertification

As noted in the previous blog, I had 22 points toward my required 40 Part 2 points. Once I completed 20 more QOW’s I was to receive 10 more points, which would bring me to a total 32 Points as noted in the screenshot below:

 

 

 Once I completed the 20 questions,  and answered the required questionnaire, I received the following confirmation and words of congratulations:

 

 

 

Above: How I feel every time I get a congrats notice from the ABP

 

I next visited my portfolio dashboard, to verify that it was updated.  I expected to see either 32/40 complete or 30/40 complete. Much to my surprise my dashboard indicated that I had completed 40/40 or ALL of my 40 required Part 2 points.  Clearly this was an error and likely due to the new QOW changes being configured incorrectly.

 

 

 

 

Today I called the Board to let them know of this probable glitch since this is likely a system wide issue. 

I next checked my MOC transcript and clearly I received duplicate credit for questions completed on the same day.  Once the glitch in the system is fixed, this should be adjusted and I will update this blog. The screenshot of my transcript is below:

  

 

 

I next wanted to check if I received the CME credit and the link for that is “View Completed Activities“ which is noted in the screenshot below:

 

Once this Is clicked you are taken to the screenshot below. Activities for my current cycle are noted with a red asterisk. There you can see that only activities completed in 2017 are eligible for CME credit. I suspect that only 1 certificate will appear once the glitch is fixed.

 

Once I clicked on the CME certificate link I was taken to the screenshot below. The certificate confirmed that I completed the activity on December 31, 1969. Yes , December 1969.  

 

 

I was in the 4th grade. Just to put this in the right perspective that was 11 months after the New York Jets won the Super Bowl.

Above: How I felt when realizing I was in the 3rd grade in 1969

 

I noted this to the Board when I called them, clearly there are a few glitches to work out and they appreciated that. I will update you when this is corrected in a future blog, which I suspect will occur before the Jets appear, let alone, win their 2nd Super Bowl

 

 

What you need to know:

 

In order to receive 10 Part 2 MOC points for the Question of the Week, you need to answer 20 questions correctly and complete an online questionnaire. In addition, you will also receive 10 hours of CME credits for your efforts. There seems to be a glitch in the system, possibly due to the new QOW credit system, which will likely be corrected by the American Board of Pediatrics now that they are aware of this issue.

   

Light a Fire

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Friday, 24 June 2016. Posted in Maintenance of Certification (MOC), Pediatrics Recertification

Light a fire if you're among the lucky ones who have registered for and are planning on taking the Part 3 Cognitive Expertise Secure Exam before the summer break. You are in the home stretch. It's down to the wire and it’s time to light a fire to your studying.

Earlier this month we pre-released 100 copies of the 5th and newest edition of our popular Surfing Your Way to Pediatric Recertification and the MOC Process. For those of you unable to get a copy we have some good news. We now have the book available in stock and ready for shipment. For those of you in the home stretch and wish to use our book in our promo code lightafireonMOC to receive 10% off. 

For those of you who have not signed up for the exam, there may (or may not) still be time to sign up. There is only one way to find out by checking into this link.

MOC pediatrics

Wouldn't It Be Nice?

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Tuesday, 10 May 2016. Posted in Pediatrics Recertification

If you are at the end of your 2nd MOC cycle and are required to pass the Cognitive Expertise Secure Exam, then this could be the most vulnerable time of the year. Why do we say that? Well, if you do not sign up for and take “The Exam“ before July then you won’t have another chance at it until September.  Both Members of Congress and those who administer “The Exam” are off on vacation during the months of July and August.

Above: ABP members on summer vacation

Wouldn’t it be nice, (which is also the title of an old Beach Boys tune) to hear the good news that you passed the exam during the summer? You would be able to enjoy the rest of the summer months and surf the boards (which is similar to the title of our study guide) knowing that you have completed the Part 3 MOC requirement for another 10 years.

On the other hand, if you have not successfully passed the exam you will at least have the rest of the summer to get it right. This way, you have plenty of time to get it right the next time, well before the December deadline for passing the secured exam. It is now May and July is just around the bend.  So Surfs up, and time to paddle to the nearest Prometric® Center and sign up through the specific link set up for those taking American Board of Pediatric exams.

In addition to paddling your way to the website, you have the option of taking a test drive at the actual center, but there may be a cost associated with this.  This may not be necessary since, let’s face it, anyone taking the MOC secure exam is experienced. But if you are of the older generation that is not familiar with computerized exam is might be worth it. You can arrange this test drive through this link

Regardless, we suggest that you get on this right away so you know well in advance where and when you will be taking this exam.  If you want to really enjoy the summer surfing season by surfing your way to recertification, sign up immediately. July is right around the corner. 

Don't be like this guy:

Be like this guy and Surf Your Way to Pediatric Recertification:

Pediatric MOC QOW and the Slow and Steady / Binge Option

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Sunday, 14 February 2016. Posted in Maintenance of Certification (MOC), Pediatrics Recertification

One of the options for obtaining MOC Part 2 credits is the ABP Question of the week or QOW[1] as they like to call it. The ABP releases 1 question per week, with a break for Christmas and New Year.  This totals 50 questions per year. Once you sign up up, the QOW is inconveniently sent to your already cluttered email box.  You can of course just log into your portfolio to access the question and send this email to the trash if you would like.

For every 25 questions you answer correctly you get 10 Part 2 MOC points.

Each QOW consists of:

1) A case study
2) Pre test Question: Before reading the abstract and discussion you take a guess at the correct answer.
3) A thrilling abstract filled with breathtaking stats and equations

4) A stimulating discussion about the abstract with even more exciting stats. They then, finally give you relevant information to your practice
5) Post test Question

Another chance to answer the same question. Since you have now gone through the abstract and exciting discussion you are now expected to answer the question correctly.

You only get one shot at the post test. If you get it right you get your pellet and are 1/25th closer to the 10 Points of Part 2 Credit you are seeking.

Slow and Steady Wins the Race Method

This is an opportunity to slowly but relatively painlessly chip away at the Part 2 MOC payload.

Since you need to answer an entire set of 25 questions to get the 10 points, there is absolutely no margin of error if you want to get the 20 points offered each year.

Slow and steady of course won’t work if you have left this to the last minute.

BINGE – QOW Method

If you are in the beginning of your MOC cycle you have the luxury of time

These questions are all there for the taking since they have been sending out and archiving the QOW since December 2013. As a result, you can, “ binge QOW “[2] your way to earning points, by going through all of the QOWs published and available since the beginning.

BINGE and SLOW Method

If you are early in your cycle as I am then you can binge QOW and go slow and steady as well.

Warning, they expect you to spend 20 minutes with each question, so keep this in mind if you choose to “binge QOW” your way to points. Theoretically, you can get through this in less than 20 minutes, but you are attesting to having taken the full 20 minutes when you submit each QOW for MOC credit.  

Sharpen your pencils and you will see that they have archived a full 50 questions for 2014 and 2015 waiting for you to binge on.  This means that there are 40 points available to you before you even start answering one question per week.

Recall that we recommend earning 60 of your combined Part 2 / Part 4 100 point requirement through Part 2 activities.

This means that if you answered all of the archived QOWs correctly to earn 40 points and then slowly earn 20 more through the slow and steady method, you have earned your 60 Part 2 credits exclusively through QOW.

I just started my next 5-year MOC cycle and it seems that I might be able to knock this requirement within my first year of this current cycle.

 

Fulfilling your Entire Part Quota with QOW?

As we note in our Down to the Wire Guide to Completing the Pediatric MOC PDF you will see that there are advantages to earning MOC credit through the Knowledge Self Assessment and the Decision Skills Self Assessment modules. As I go through the process I will research whether one can still go through these modules without needing the credit.

Below is a screen shot of my status at this point. I currently have 11 out of the necessary 25 points to get my 10 Part Credits.  I will post my next blog once I have successfully answered my 25 questions and received my first 10 Part 2 points for this cycle. Notice I answered 11 out of 15 questions correctly. I will make suggestions on avoiding this pitfall in my next blog post.

For those of you who prefer video, click this link to the ABP video blog that explains the QOW option for Part 2 MOC credit. 



[1] Pronounced COW

[2] hmm I may have coined a new term

Before the Ball Drops

on Friday, 20 November 2015. Posted in Pediatrics Recertification

For those of you with certificates that expire in 2015, hopefully you've already completed the requirements for the current MOC cycle.  If one of your requirements is completing Part 3, the cognitive expertise “secure exam”, this is one ball you don't want to drop.

You might have circled December 31st on your calendar as the day the ball is dropped from the roof of One Time Square .  But, if you wait until the 31st you will have dropped the ball on getting your certificate renewed.  You needed to circle November 30th at 3PM as the deadline for registering to take the exam at one of the prometric test sites.  That's 3PM Eastern Standard time for those of you living in Arizona refusing to set your clocks forward.  The deadline for taking the exam is actually December 15th. After that your ball turns into a pumpkin and you'll be searching for the lost glass slipper of recertification.

If you are one of those adrenaline junkies who are still watching the clock tick there is still time left to prepare.

For those of you wishing to use our material the bad news is we will not have a new edition of Surfing Your Way to Pediatric Recertification until early 2016. However, the good news is we have already released the brand new 6th edition of Laughing Your Way to Passing the Pediatric Boards this fall.  The updated material is the same material included in the soon to be released Surfing Your Way to Pediatric Recertification. The only difference is the first section that is focused on the initial certification exam.  

You may order the Laughing Your Way to Passing the Pediatric Boards 6th edition and we will include our Down to the Wire Guide to Passing the MOC e-book, which includes our guide and recommended step-by-step pathway for fulfilling the MOC requirement.  The e-book includes a pre-test diagnostic quiz to help you identify areas of weakness to focus on as the clock ticks towards December 15th.

Simply order the main text using the code DROPTHEBALL2015 to get the PDF download.  No need to drop the ball now.  Prepare for the secured exam so you can actually look forward to the ball dropping on new year's eve while looking forward to a fresh start in 2016 with your MOC in place. All without worrying about dropped balls and missing glass slipper.

The Countdown to Pediatric MOC Certification 2014

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Wednesday, 29 January 2014. Posted in Maintenance of Certification (MOC), Pediatrics Recertification

We have received countless calls and emails from pediatricians who are faced with an expiring board certificate and the specter of sitting for a proctored exam for the first time in over 10 years. 

At least this is a task that most of us have a successful track record with or we wouldn’t be Board Certified Pediatricians in need of recertification

However, getting through Parts 2 and Parts 4 are even more daunting since it is not clear what exactly needs to be done to get credit.

I know I personally had no idea of the details until I went through the process myself last year. I even wrote about it.

Even once the process began to make sense, and you roll up your gingham patterned sleeves another curve ball hits the outside corner. Last year the scoring system changed. This year the expiration date for your pediatric board certification expires on December 18th rather than December 31st.

However don’t despair we are here to help you get through the MOC process.

In order to get through it last year I had to go through several trials and errors. These included glitches in:

  • Registering for the exam 
  • What I should have brought to the exam
  • What I shouldn’t have brought to the exam
  • What I forgot to bring to the exam

(The security in the exam center felt like I was in an airport surrounded by marginally dressed TSA agents)

Prometrics exam meme

I spent days and weeks trying to determine which were the least confusing, most useful and cost effective (cheaper) modules to go through. The explanations on the websites were not always easy to follow. There were no arrows pointing to the best and least time consuming modules.

I found myself so confused and bored flies were landing on my bloodshot eyes and it took me 3 hours to notice. That is when I decided to get on the phone with both the American Board of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

bored at the moc process

I remember wishing for a simple monograph I could use to supplement the study materials I had used. A monograph that would walk me through the process and provide me with a general idea of what material I needed to focus on.  Believe me I searched for such a concise booklet but was stuck with the outlines on the American Board of Pediatrics and American Academy of Pediatrics Websites, which were anything but concise.  Without the numerous phone calls I would probably be scrambling to get my MOC recertification completed along with the class of 2014.

After I successfully completed the cycle I decided to put together a monograph so that my colleagues could benefit from the legwork I did to simplify the process for myself.

We also included a MOC Nuggets ™ section which will help you gauge how prepared you are regarding fund of knowledge for the pediatric recertification process. Like all of our material, this is based on the content specifications of the American Board of Pediatrics.

The sample questions and answers include tips on how to break down questions. This will be especially valuable to those of you have not studied nor sat for an exam in more than a decade.

This guide will help you get through the process in the spirit in which it is intended.  Your focus should be on learning the material in the modules, and improving the quality of your practice rather than trying to figure out the process itself. 

 

pediatric recertification meme

Keeping Score of the Pediatric Recertification (MOC) Grading Changes

on Friday, 13 September 2013. Posted in Maintenance of Certification (MOC), Pediatrics Recertification

We just released our blog with suggestions on taking the MOC 3 Pediatric Recertification Exam. Within a day we received a notice from the ABP which was also posted on their website that they are changing the way the exam will be scored and how the results will be provided.

I didn’t mention in the previous blog that I did indeed score high enough to pass my Part 3 MOC (hold the applause please) and boy am I glad since I do not like any change.

(For those of you like this information straight up on the rocks, this is the link to the American Board of Pediatrics announcement: http://bit.ly/15o4bot)

Here is the TL:DR (too long didn’t read) version:

1)    What percentage correct do you now need to pass the exam?

You still need to get around 75% correct to pass the exam, and yes that means you need to get approximately 75% to get a raw score of 180.

2) What was wrong with the old way of scoring…back in the good old days of June 2013, when life was simple and sweet?

Well that is a good question and the answer is back in those days there was essentially only one exam that everyone took. Today in the era of September 2013, there is more than 1 exam and that leads to a greater variation in the amount and type of questions (note: there may be some overlap with what questions are asked on each specific exam). Therefore, there is much more “examic diversity” and all of the exams are not created equally. Some questions are easier than others.  Therefore, the percentage correct will not necessarily be the same for each exam. Some, for example, might allow a passing grade for a score below 75%. However the scaled score for that passing grade will be 180.

3)    Will I still know how I did in each specialty?

In the past you were told what percentage correct you got broken down by specialty. Now, you are going to be told, your raw score for each of the 17-specialty areas.

**They are going to a standardized score**

Up until now it was pretty straightforward: you got around 75% correct (not 80%) and you passed. There was essentially ONE test given

Bottom line is you need a scaled score of 180 to pass, but the percentage correct you need for that raw score will now vary depending on which version of the exam you are taking.

If you have not taken the exam yet and your certification expires December 31st, 2013 we suggest you sign up now since you can take twice and you want to leave yourself a margin of error.

 

pediatrics_recertification_changes 

Be Decisive With Pediatric Decision Making Self Assessment Part 2

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Monday, 10 June 2013. Posted in Pediatrics MOC , Pediatrics Recertification, Pediatric recertification, pediatrics board review

I am happy to report that I did reach the 80% mark and am now the proud owner of 20 more Part 2 Pediatric MOC points. This brings my total up to 30 Part 2 Pediatric MOC points.

How did I approach it differently this time? 

1)    For one thing I made sure I was very certain I had the correct answer (should be obvious).

2)    If it seemed to be challenging I held off on answering it.

3)    Free throws  - I went through the ones that to me were pretty easy to figure out fairly quickly.

4)    Challenging Layups - If I still wasn’t sure I went back and made notes on the information that was being presented and often this was enough to make the answer apparent.

5)    Needs some time - In some cases this was not enough and the obvious answers didn’t seem to be correct.

6)    All along the way I kept track of the percentage correct, with each correct answer I got closer and closer to the 80% number.

7)    I also tracked the number of incorrect answers I was getting and yes even despite this approach I still answered questions incorrectly.

8)    Since this is an open book, which is now an outdated term; more like an open google test. I used google for the “ needs some time” category. The way I did it was by simply searching for the clinical descriptions and lab findings .

9)    More often than not this helped me discover the correct answer and I actually found myself learning along the process.

10)  Once I reached the magical number 0f 80% I still had a couple more questions to go but the pressure was off.

11)  But I and you should still want to get as high a score as possible. After all, this is a really good opportunity to learn. Although the process is challenging the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) really set it up so you review a lot of material.

12)  So I took a different approach this time and reached 84% and now am the proud owner of 20 points toward fulfilling my Part 2 Pediatric MOC requirement.

13) Yes that means I got 8 wrong, which is quite close to comfort, in missing out on an opportunity to get 20 points on what I believe is one of the more useful, and least painful ways to get your Part 2 Pediatric MOC points.

Be decisive with Pediatrics Certification Review

 

Recall that I already got 10 points on the dashboard for completing 2013 General Pediatrics Comprehensive Knowledge Self- Assessment and now have 30 Points.

Therefore, I suggest you go through this process the way you would approach anything that required concentration. If this means putting on your thinking caps and playing ocean sounds then do it. (see previous blog)

Remember to be methodical; they are presenting material in broad strokes. The question consisted of a history, physical and lab / imaging studies.  I made a list of all the pertinent positive findings and pertinent negative findings. This allowed me to filter out irrelevant negatives.

I noted when something had “quotes” around it, it meant that things weren’t necessarily what the patient was describing, and I made a “beware” notation on my notes.

One of the benefits of this section is once you have “committed to an answer” you can print out the case summary which helps outline fine points of difference in differential diagnosis which is sure to be helpful in preparing for the secured Part 3: Pediatric MOC exam.

So my scorecard so far is

Part 2 Points:

2013 General Pediatrics Comprehensive Knowledge Self-Assessment: 10

2013 General Pediatrics Decision Skills Self-Assessment:  20

Still need 10 more to meet the minimum of 40 Part 2 points. I will need 30 more points if I want to use Part 2 points for the 20 “either Part 2 or Part 4 “ category toward the total 100 points needed for Parts 2 and Parts 4. Wow, I think I just confused myself.

I will let you know in the next blog where my search for the most useful and least difficult to pass MOC Part 2 activities 

Be Decisive With Pediatric Decision Making Self Assessment Part 1

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Friday, 31 May 2013. Posted in Maintenance of Certification (MOC), Pediatrics MOC , Pediatrics Recertification, Pediatric recertification, Pediatric Maintenance of Certification

Pediatrics MOC 

When we last left off, I had only receive 10 Points toward my total of 20 Part 2 Lifelong Learning and Self Assessment points:

I was previously going through the Pediatric Decision Making Self Assessment activity. Which when completed would yield me 20 more points on the Big Board, half of the 40 points required for Part 2: Pediatric Maintenance of Certification (MOC).

However, this was not a softball toss since a minimum score of 80% was required to grab this 20-point brass ring. Simple enough?

Pediatrics MOC decision skills self assessment  

How I felt when I found out I needed 80% correct answers on the pediatrics decision skills self assessment test

 

Not really! You are given 50 case scenarios, and a score of 80% means you cannot miss more than 10 of these (you might want to check the math). It is all or none, you might understand much of what you are reading but if you choose the wrong answer there is no going back. This is not one of those CME tests you answer until you get the right answer which by the way, is my favorite type of CME test since the creation of the internet by Al Gore.

It really isn’t a “self assessment” since you are being assessed by the American Board of Pediatrics based on the decisions you “commit to”. I would call it more of an assessment by the ABP of whether you can keep your Pediatric certification. But lets not get caught up in semantics.

Pediatrics MOC correct answer

How I feel when I get a pediatrics MOC question correct

I was handled a nice big slice of humble pie when I did not hit the decision making hammer hard enough to hit the 80% bell. It seems I missed the 80% by taking this activity too lightly. I did it in several sittings. Often when I was tired at the end of a long day or while listening to the theme song from Law and Order on iTunes rather than ocean sounds as recommended in a previous blog. 

Honestly, I did not follow my own advice of going through the answers in detail.  I just wanted to get through them and get my 20 points so I can continue working as a pediatrician.

I now faced just one more chance to ring the bell, there would not be a 3rd chance to get my ticket punched on this relatively easy and useful activity.

This is a very useful activity since it really has value clinically and for preparing for the MOC Pediatric Recertification “secured“ exam.  

In several instances you are presented with very similar patients, i.e. 12 year old with leg pain, but the clinical presentation are quite different.  This is a great exercise in teaching and demonstrating why and how reading the question is so important and is really hitting at differential diagnosis.  

In my next blog, I will tell you how my second attempt went. Stay tuned!

Jumping into the Part 2 MOC Pool

on Wednesday, 01 May 2013. Posted in Maintenance of Certification (MOC), Pediatrics MOC , Pediatrics Recertification, Pediatric recertification, pediatrics board review, Pediatric Maintenance of Certification

Well it is now May and more than ¼ into the calendar year. The deadline for completing the Pediatrics MOC (Maintenance of Certification) cycle including the exam is looming. Since I do need to leave a margin of error, I have decided now is the time to get through Part 2 of the MOC cycle and begin thinking about Part 4. Recall, I already completed Part 1 by having a medical license.

Pediatrics Recertification

I discovered that Parts 2 and Parts 4 are intimately linked like Heckle and Jeckle

Between Parts 2 and Parts 4, I must complete 100 points divided as follows:

  -Part 2 – Lifelong Learning Cognitive Expertise: 40 Points

  -Part 4 - Performance in Practice: 40 Points

 

Therefore, I must get at least 40 points through Part 2 Activities.  There is an additional 20 points that I can decide between Part 2 and Part 4 Activities.  At this point I am not sure which way I will go with this.  This is because Part 4 Performance in Practice is a large unknown. 

 

This still begs the question, if Parts 2 and 4 are activities done in concert with each other, why aren’t these PARTs 2 and 3 with the exam being Part 4.  As if the process isn’t convoluted enough.

 

This is like Billy Crystal inAnalyze This asking ”How can we talk about the first thing without discussing the 2nd thing first???”

 

Part 2 is primarily questions and answers on relatively known territory. In a previous blog I noted that there are 3 options for Part 2.

At the time of that writing I didn’t pay any particular attention to the details of these 3 options. That was because I wasn’t personally going through the process.  I now have learned more and will share that with you now..  Boy this has more subplots and number patterns than an episode of Touch.

The components are as follows with my analysis of each:

 

            Knowledge Self Assessment- While there are a variety of options which you can search for the one I suggest as a no–brainer is the “American Board of Pediatrics General Pediatrics Comprehensive Knowledge Self- assessment, 2013” which consists of 200 multiple choice questions selected from the secure exam (aka Part 3) pool. You get to kill 2 MOC birds with 1 stone. You get 10 “Part 2 points” while practicing for the test and assessing your areas of strength and weaknesses.

You are also told that your chances of passing the secure exam can be predicted based on how you do on this set of questions as follows:

 

Your score

Likelihood of passing the Secure Part 3 Exam

80% or greater

Likely

66% -79%

“Uncertain

65% or less

 FUGGETABOUTIT [1]

 

Pediatric Recertification

 

The best part of all is there is no minimal number correct to pass.  You can also take this as many times as you want and essentially know these questions cold.  You get “immediate feedback“ which simply means you will be told either you answered the question correctly or you answered it incorrectly. In addition, you will be told which answer was correct.

However, you will not be provided with detailed answers. This is where a good review book will come in handy. You can take notes or study in real time regarding the details of the topic being questioned and learn it for the next time the concept is tested or when you come across it clinically, which is supposedly the point of all this.

I was so excited about this that I re-enrolled for another set of questions. After answering the questions again, I got a confirmation of completion email from the ABP which stated that I can check my dashboard to see how it was applied. I assumed I would be getting 10 more points. WRONG! You only get credit for this set of questions once and once only.

 

I really do suggest you take the time to write down the specific topics you do not do well on and START with those topics when reviewing for the Part 3 recertification exam requirement. There are also a limited number of images you have to click on for some of the questions, much like you will have to do on the actual exam.

There are other sets of questions you can choose from.  To my own peril I thought the same rules applied that no passing grade was required.  At this point it appears, that for the other options you need to get 80% correct. Unlike other CME question sets, you do NOT get to answer them over and over until you get them right. Here you only get ONE more opportunity to answer the questions you got wrong.  If you still don’t reach the 80% threshold, that module is not available for you this year.

So I decided to try my hand at the next  option which are:

Subspecialty Questions

Well here again, you have to get at least 80% correct and do not have unlimited attempts to answer the questions you got wrong. After a humiliating attempt to answer subspecialty questions I decided to try my hand at the 3rd Part 2 activity, which is:

Decision Self Assessment Skills

This is worth 20 Part 2 points and is more in line with General Pediatrics. Interestingly, it actually is fun.

Here you are given a patient brief history and are provided with a medical history , physical findings and diagnostic studies. There are 50 such questions.

You then have to either pick a diagnosis, or decide what study to do next etc. There are more than 4 choices here. After going through all this, you are either right or wrong.

Here you also have to get 80% correct which means you can only get 10 wrong in order to hit the bell and get your 20 points.

If you do not get 80% you get to take it again. However if you still get less than 80% on your second chance, you are done and will have to find other activities to get your Part 2 card punched.

In this case you ARE given detailed explanation and summary but only after you have committed to an answer.

I am currently in the middle of this and will update my status with the next blog. If I successfully complete this activity I will have 30 total points (20 here and 10 from the General Pediatric Knowledge Self Assessment)

I will still have to choose another activity worth 10 points to get my 40 Part 2 points.

I will need another 20 Part 2 points if I choose my combination points to be Part 2 rather than Part 4.

Once I complete the Decision Skills section… hopefully successfully I will write about my next steps on the road to MOC.

By the way we invite you to discuss your experiences and if you found any relatively painless approved activities for completing the Part 2 requirement.



[1] Outside of Brooklyn the phrasing is different.