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Nominate Yourself!

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Friday, 02 September 2016. Posted in pediatrics board review

With the RNC convention DNC convention over, did you ever wish you could just nominate yourself? Well it turns out that you CAN nominate yourself .  Well….you can’t just nominate yourself to be president, although I am not sure who would want to anyway!

You can however, nominate yourself to be on the General Pediatrics Examination Committee. If you are board certified in a pediatric subspecialty you can even nominate yourself to one the subspecialty board exam committees.

If you are selected you will have plenty of power without having to go through debates and public scrutiny of your dress and whether your hair is real or a variation on marsupial fur. You would be involved in reviewing and even writing questions for the in-training exam (ITE), initial certification and maintenance of certification exams. You might even be asked to determine the passing standards for each exam.  Remember no good deed goes unpunished, so when the crowd boos the exam, you will be on stage instead of being in the crowd joining the boo birds in the cheap seats.

For more information on how you can nominate yourself or nominate a friend (or enemy) you can get additional information through this link

ITE Makes Might

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Thursday, 28 July 2016. Posted in pediatrics board review

Depending upon your residency program, you will have already taken or will be taking the In-Training Examination. This is a trial run for the actual Pediatric Boards you will be taking eventually.  If you are the Chief Resident you can also take this trial run if you are listed in their pediatric residency tracking roster. 

pediatric test in progress

This is an excellent way to see which areas you are weak in and which you are strong in. It will be very tempting to focus on the areas you are strong in but it will not help you get a better score on next year’s ITE exam or on the boards itself. This exam consists of 150 multiple choice questions that are based the same content specifications used for the boards. Diligently using this exam will enable you to continue to get stronger in previously weak areas. In that case ITE does make might! 

pass pediatric boards


Reset Your Part 3 MOC clock

on Wednesday, 13 July 2016. Posted in Pediatrics MOC , Pediatric recertification

I am at the point in my MOC cycle where I must complete my next Part 2 and Part 4 cycles by December 2020.  Interestingly enough, even though this is 4 years away, I noted that the date is December 17th, 2020. If I leave this all to the last minute, that can be a problem since most of us think in terms of the calendar year ending December 31st with the dropping of the Times Square ball. The Pediatric MOC ball drop occurs 14 days earlier.

However, I have no intention to leave this for the last minute let alone get even close to that deadline. In fact, as those of you following this blog already know, I currently have 10 out of my 40 MOC Part 1 points checked off through the ABP QOW outlined in a previous blog.


Above: How I feel when the ABP gives me MOC points

That said, my Part 3 Cognitive Expertise Exam isn’t due until the year 2023.  Since I am recommending staying ahead of the game and steering clear of deadlines, wouldn’t it make sense to just go ahead and take the exam now and postpone the deadline another ten years? That would make it so I would not have to take another exam until the year 2033 which sounds like a year in a science fiction movie. 


Above: Planning my MOC future

So I went ahead to see how that would work while logged into my MOC portfolio and there I got the following recommendation:

“Your online MOC exam application should only be submitted in the year the exam is due and your General Pediatrics Maintenance of Certification Examination is not due until 2023. Registration for this examination will open January 1, 2023. If you would like to request to take your examination earlier than 2023, then please send that request to MOC Administration staff at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for assistance.”

Above: What it feels like when logging into my ABP portfolio. For sound effects click here.

So it seems I would need special permission to take it early. However, taking it early will only postpone it another 10 years from now. That would mean my exam is postponed until 2026 not 2033. Alas, I might as well stick with the 2023 expiration date.  This is especially true since the ABP may be doing away with the secure exam for Part 3 Pediatric MOC credit. We will update you on this in a future blog. 

Above: Me racking up MOC points before they are due

Light a Fire

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Friday, 24 June 2016. Posted in Maintenance of Certification (MOC), Pediatrics Recertification

Light a fire if you're among the lucky ones who have registered for and are planning on taking the Part 3 Cognitive Expertise Secure Exam before the summer break. You are in the home stretch. It's down to the wire and it’s time to light a fire to your studying.

Earlier this month we pre-released 100 copies of the 5th and newest edition of our popular Surfing Your Way to Pediatric Recertification and the MOC Process. For those of you unable to get a copy we have some good news. We now have the book available in stock and ready for shipment. For those of you in the home stretch and wish to use our book in our promo code lightafireonMOC to receive 10% off. 

For those of you who have not signed up for the exam, there may (or may not) still be time to sign up. There is only one way to find out by checking into this link.

MOC pediatrics

Announcing the Release of the 5th Edition of “Surfing Your Way to Pediatric Recertification”

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Wednesday, 18 May 2016. Posted in Pediatrics MOC

By now we are assuming that you have already arranged to take the Cognitive Expertise Secure Exam aka MOC Part 3. Once again, taking it before the summer buys you time to prepare in the event that you do not pass the first time.  If you pass!? Then you are done for another 10 years and can really enjoy your summer vacation as we noted in our previous blog

However, Part 3 is only one part of the MOC process you must complete before your December expiration date.  In order to help you to prepare for and be familiar with all aspects of the Pediatric MOC process we are happy to finally announce the release of the latest edition of our Surfing Your Way to Pediatric Recertification and Guide to the MOC Process ® 5th edition.  

This updated edition includes a complete overhaul of the material that you will be tested on. This mirrors the material included in the 6th edition of our main text "Laughing Your Way to Passing the Pediatric Boards" which was also recently released. All of this was based on the content specifications provided by the American Board of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatrics.  

This newly released title includes new chapters on “Ethics for the Primary Care Physician” and “Patient Safety and Quality Improvement” which have been added to the exam.  

The new Surfing your Way to Recertification, however, focuses on the entire MOC process saving you hours of head scratching tab delete keystrokes trying to understand exactly what is expected of you.

We review suggested modules and provide recommendations for the Part 2 and Part 4 MOC requirements.

Part 1 requires no guidelines since that is the easy one, which requires you to have an active medical license or its equivalent. We assume you already have that since that is the admission ticket to even get through the MOC door. 

We are very excited about this new release and with July 1st coming soon, we want to thank all of you who have written us and patiently awaited the release of the title.  As a token of our thanks and to assist you in overcoming procrastination we are offering a discount code (code: RELEASETHE5TH) that will be good from now through June 1st, which will provide you with a 10% discount.

Above: my reaction when passing the MOC exam

Wouldn't It Be Nice?

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Tuesday, 10 May 2016. Posted in Pediatrics Recertification

If you are at the end of your 2nd MOC cycle and are required to pass the Cognitive Expertise Secure Exam, then this could be the most vulnerable time of the year. Why do we say that? Well, if you do not sign up for and take “The Exam“ before July then you won’t have another chance at it until September.  Both Members of Congress and those who administer “The Exam” are off on vacation during the months of July and August.

Above: ABP members on summer vacation

Wouldn’t it be nice, (which is also the title of an old Beach Boys tune) to hear the good news that you passed the exam during the summer? You would be able to enjoy the rest of the summer months and surf the boards (which is similar to the title of our study guide) knowing that you have completed the Part 3 MOC requirement for another 10 years.

On the other hand, if you have not successfully passed the exam you will at least have the rest of the summer to get it right. This way, you have plenty of time to get it right the next time, well before the December deadline for passing the secured exam. It is now May and July is just around the bend.  So Surfs up, and time to paddle to the nearest Prometric® Center and sign up through the specific link set up for those taking American Board of Pediatric exams.

In addition to paddling your way to the website, you have the option of taking a test drive at the actual center, but there may be a cost associated with this.  This may not be necessary since, let’s face it, anyone taking the MOC secure exam is experienced. But if you are of the older generation that is not familiar with computerized exam is might be worth it. You can arrange this test drive through this link

Regardless, we suggest that you get on this right away so you know well in advance where and when you will be taking this exam.  If you want to really enjoy the summer surfing season by surfing your way to recertification, sign up immediately. July is right around the corner. 

Don't be like this guy:

Be like this guy and Surf Your Way to Pediatric Recertification:

Program by Program Passing Rate: Does it Matter?

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Friday, 15 April 2016. Posted in pediatrics board review

The American Board of Pediatrics has a report that includes the pass rates for residents taking the General Pediatric Certification Exam for the first time. The report included the same pass rate for Pediatric Residency Programs both in the US and Canada.  An important stat included in the report was the confidence interval.


They emphasize that the confidence interval is important when interpreting the data. The reason for this is, .. uh , um …. actually at this point I am not sure, since my mind kept wandering as I read the gruesome explanation.  We have included a link to the information which you can read on your own. However, does it really matter?

If you are going to learn about nuanced statistical analysis regarding confidence intervals, you are better off spending your energy studying the statistics topics you are responsible for on the pediatric certification exam.


While this information might be useful on an aggregate level it is not really relevant on an individual basis. In fact, the analysis and explanation of the report focuses primarily on the limitation of the statistics.  They note that the confidence interval varies by the number of trainees, especially those with fewer than 25 trainees (is that your program?). They also note that if there were significant changes in the program during the period of time studied then the data is no longer accurate.

Therefore, we are presenting this information to you, but our take home message is that in your case there is only one trainee you should be interested in regardless of where you are training or trained.  If you prepare and study effectively you should be among the residents who pass the first time around. 

Additionally, if you are taking the exam for the 2nd time, then you can and should implement changes in the way you prepare for the exam.  Remember, the statistics don’t take into consideration those from residency programs that implemented improvements.


It certainly won’t factor in effective exam preparation strategies you will implement regardless of where you trained. In fact, the 6th Edition of our Laughing Your Way to Passing the Pediatric Boards has a chapter on this topic

Remember, the pass rate in this study only includes those who pass the first time they take the exam. If you are among those who successfully pass with flying colors after failing the first time, you aren’t even being factored into this study. As a result, the study has no relevance for anyone taking the board exam for the 2nd time.

Therefore, after a casual glance you can skip this statistical study of the pass rate for pediatric residency programs. The only study you should be interested in is the study that you are participating in with a pass rate of 100% as your goal. 

Mime is Money

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Wednesday, 16 March 2016. Posted in pediatrics board review

One of my favorite lines in the movie This Is Spinal Tap involves Billy Crystal, who is the supervisor of a group of mimes serving food at a party. The company is called "shut up and eat" and while one of the waiters is complaining, Crystal says "don't talk back mime is money".

While that may be true, it is clearly a play on the expression “Time is Money” since a talking mime hired to serve food isn’t doing what he's paid for.

For those of you planning on taking the General Pediatric Certification exam, time is definitely money ($345 to be exact). Why $345!? That is the late fee for those registering after March 31st for the next exam. The dates of the exam is between October 18th and 20th at a Prometrics ® test center near you. This may seem like a long time from now, but March 31st is right around the corner!

Just change the above caption to "if you don't stop and look around, the price of the Pediatric General Certifying exam goes up because the ABP thinks we have a ton of money to blow"

Just to clarify, this $345 late fee is already on top of the $2,265 it costs to register for the exam before the March 31st deadline.

Above: The guy on the ladder looks an awful lot like the ABP!

Inevitably, there will be glitches in the registration process. Therefore, you should register right now while it's on your mind! $345 is enough to even make a mime talk back!

So don’t talk back, just click this link and register for the exam.  In fact, for those of you who register before the deadline you can use the following code: REGISTER2016 to get 10% off on our board review books. That, combined with the $345 late fee you will avoid, will go a long way to passing the exam this October, which isn't as far in the distance as you think.

The QOW Experience

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Tuesday, 01 March 2016. Posted in Maintenance of Certification (MOC), Pediatrics MOC , Pediatric recertification, Pediatric Maintenance of Certification

In my previous blog last week, I noted that the ABP QOW was a great way to get MOC Part 2 credit.  Each year, the ABP has been releasing 50 questions a year, one week at a time.  They have been doing so since December 2013 which means folks like me who are entering their MOC cycle can catch up if they would like.  For every 25 questions you answer correctly you get awarded 10 Part 2 MOC points out of the 40 required points.

Above GIF: How I feel when answering a QOW correctly

In the last blog, I had 11 out of the required 25 questions answered correctly. I also got 4 questions wrong.  This is the key, you must answer them correctly for it to count.   Since I am working on 2014 and 2015, there are 100 questions with a potential for 40 points available.  In that context it is very easy to get sloppy and answer the questions incorrectly.  And I have been guilty of this. However, since I am in year one of a 5-year cycle, this won’t be too costly since there are other Part 2 MOC modules available.  Even if I decide to get all of my MOC Part 2 points through the QOW, I have future years to continue the process.

Above GIF: My reaction when answering a QOW question incorrectly

Once you answer the question there is a forum for each question you can post comments to.

One reader even noted that he answered the question correctly on the Pre-Test but got it wrong after reading the abstract and discussion.  This reader’s advice was to not read the answers before reading the abstract.  This is personal taste.   The bottom line is: if you need these points this year, then you have to go through the abstract and discussion with emphasis on the conclusion and the parts of the discussion that focuses on the key points in the question.

If you have already gone through all of the archived questions then you will have to wait an entire week to move on to the next question since the QOW is question of the week!

When you answer the question correctly you must “claim your pearl “ by clicking the appropriate button illustrated in the screen shot below. Below that is the "post" button and "comment section". This is where you post your comments that other readers can read or just ignore.


Once you answered 25 questions correctly and claimed all 25 pearls, you get a nice little sticker that says the following:  


Your stats on that set of questions gets reset, thus I was unable to go back and get a screen shot for this blog.

I then went to my dashboard which is in the screen shot below. As you can see I now have 10 out of 40 required Part 2 MOC Lifelong Learning and Self Assessment Points needed by December 17th 2020.  


Of note you do not get CME Credit for completing the QOW. I will review the other modules that we recommend for Part 2 MOC Credit in future blogs some of which do provide an opportunity for free CME credit. The nice thing is you can get all of your credit through QOW and still take advantage of the other modules, which helps you to prepare for the Part 3 secured exam AND provides CME credit.

I am currently going through my next set of questions and have 10 out of the required 25 questions completed. As I move along in the cycle I will provide updates on my experience with advise on avoiding the pitfalls I encounter. 


Pediatric MOC QOW and the Slow and Steady / Binge Option

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Sunday, 14 February 2016. Posted in Maintenance of Certification (MOC), Pediatrics Recertification

One of the options for obtaining MOC Part 2 credits is the ABP Question of the week or QOW[1] as they like to call it. The ABP releases 1 question per week, with a break for Christmas and New Year.  This totals 50 questions per year. Once you sign up up, the QOW is inconveniently sent to your already cluttered email box.  You can of course just log into your portfolio to access the question and send this email to the trash if you would like.

For every 25 questions you answer correctly you get 10 Part 2 MOC points.

Each QOW consists of:

1) A case study
2) Pre test Question: Before reading the abstract and discussion you take a guess at the correct answer.
3) A thrilling abstract filled with breathtaking stats and equations

4) A stimulating discussion about the abstract with even more exciting stats. They then, finally give you relevant information to your practice
5) Post test Question

Another chance to answer the same question. Since you have now gone through the abstract and exciting discussion you are now expected to answer the question correctly.

You only get one shot at the post test. If you get it right you get your pellet and are 1/25th closer to the 10 Points of Part 2 Credit you are seeking.

Slow and Steady Wins the Race Method

This is an opportunity to slowly but relatively painlessly chip away at the Part 2 MOC payload.

Since you need to answer an entire set of 25 questions to get the 10 points, there is absolutely no margin of error if you want to get the 20 points offered each year.

Slow and steady of course won’t work if you have left this to the last minute.

BINGE – QOW Method

If you are in the beginning of your MOC cycle you have the luxury of time

These questions are all there for the taking since they have been sending out and archiving the QOW since December 2013. As a result, you can, “ binge QOW “[2] your way to earning points, by going through all of the QOWs published and available since the beginning.

BINGE and SLOW Method

If you are early in your cycle as I am then you can binge QOW and go slow and steady as well.

Warning, they expect you to spend 20 minutes with each question, so keep this in mind if you choose to “binge QOW” your way to points. Theoretically, you can get through this in less than 20 minutes, but you are attesting to having taken the full 20 minutes when you submit each QOW for MOC credit.  

Sharpen your pencils and you will see that they have archived a full 50 questions for 2014 and 2015 waiting for you to binge on.  This means that there are 40 points available to you before you even start answering one question per week.

Recall that we recommend earning 60 of your combined Part 2 / Part 4 100 point requirement through Part 2 activities.

This means that if you answered all of the archived QOWs correctly to earn 40 points and then slowly earn 20 more through the slow and steady method, you have earned your 60 Part 2 credits exclusively through QOW.

I just started my next 5-year MOC cycle and it seems that I might be able to knock this requirement within my first year of this current cycle.


Fulfilling your Entire Part Quota with QOW?

As we note in our Down to the Wire Guide to Completing the Pediatric MOC PDF you will see that there are advantages to earning MOC credit through the Knowledge Self Assessment and the Decision Skills Self Assessment modules. As I go through the process I will research whether one can still go through these modules without needing the credit.

Below is a screen shot of my status at this point. I currently have 11 out of the necessary 25 points to get my 10 Part Credits.  I will post my next blog once I have successfully answered my 25 questions and received my first 10 Part 2 points for this cycle. Notice I answered 11 out of 15 questions correctly. I will make suggestions on avoiding this pitfall in my next blog post.

For those of you who prefer video, click this link to the ABP video blog that explains the QOW option for Part 2 MOC credit. 

[1] Pronounced COW

[2] hmm I may have coined a new term

New and Improved Pediatric MOC: Part 4 Improvement in Practice

Written by Stuart Silverstein on Tuesday, 26 January 2016. Posted in Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

The MOC process continues to be abuzz with change with the ABP keeping an eye on other specialty groups that are part of the American Board of Subspecialties parent group. 

Due to this, the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) has already temporarily suspended the Quality in Practice requirement through the end of 2018, while the process is under review.

Similarly, the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) is also reviewing the Part 4 requirement. However, they have not suspended the requirements. Sorry!  

However, in the June 30th ABP Blog they concede that this is still a work in progress and offered up, what they consider to be, a more user friendly and relevant options that are outlined on their website. These seem to be variations on the same options that have been in place already.  Therefore, we are still recommending that you use the Practice Improvement Modules (PIMs).

There is, however good news for some of you. The good news is you may have fulfilled the Part 4 MOC with work you have already completed. 

Home is where the MOC is!

If you are lucky enough to be part of a practice that has taken on the onerous task of qualifying as a “Patient Centered Medical Home” (PCMH), you have already engaged in Quality Improvement (QI) activities. These activities are approved by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) and as they say, “what’s good for the NCQA goose is good for the ABP gander”. This is similar to graduating residents killing 2 birds with one MOC stone for QI projects done during residency [i].

The gruesome details on applying to the QI activities for Part 4: Improvement in Professional Practice Credit can be found here. Or you can use this video link. 

Create You Own QI

One of the more relevant ways to obtain Part 4 credit is by creating your own QI project. Personally, I do not see how this is easier or even a step-up from using one of the predesigned PIM’s but this is considered to be one of the more “intuitive” models offered by the ABP. This is also one of the paths to applying the PCMH projects for MOC Part 4 Credit. 

Institution MOC

Another avenue to explore is if you are fortunate or unfortunate enough to be a department chairman, chief quality officer or a director of public health. You may have an opportunity to get MOC credit for work already done if you have lead “substantial health care quality initiatives” in your organization. When you look in the ceiling to floor mirror and see such a person, this link applies to you.

Overall it seems that for now you have to do the busy work with the good news being that you can double-dip for the busy work you have already done. The ABP promises more changes to come as they study the issues further. Hopefully, "what’s good for the ABIM goose will be good for the ABP gander."





[i] This is called, Practice Assessment, Patient Voice and Patient Safety Requirements on the Internal Medicine MOC process. 


Kill ACGME and MOC Bird with 1 Stone

on Monday, 07 December 2015. Posted in Maintenance of Certification (MOC), Pediatric Maintenance of Certification

As of Spring 2015, residents can dip their toes into the MOC pool with the rest of us.  If you are currently a resident, you are asking yourself, "why would I want to take on something I can thankfully postpone for 5 more years?". There are more important thing's to do like, I don't know? Passing the Boards in the first place!? 

That is all true but consider this:

While you are in residency you may very well be participating in quality improvement activities to meet your ACGME requirements. Wouldn't it be nice to be able to double dip and get MOC credit that you can bank and use later when you will need it?  It's not very often that you can double dip or kill an ACGME and MOC bird with one stone.  

As a resident you are allowed to participate in Part 2 activities as well (see our MOC blog for more information on Part 2 Activities). However, your deposit into the “Bank of MOC” won't count for the future. Yet, we still encourage you to participate anyway since this will help you prepare for the Pediatric Board Certification exam. Additionally, it will also help you shine the Pediatric In-Training Examination (ITE).  

Before you qualify you have to take your first ITE and then you can start banking Part 4 MOC points when partaking in appropriate quality improvement activities during residency.  

Say No To Despair and Fear and Yes to Steps to Just Persevere

on Tuesday, 01 December 2015. Posted in failed pediatrics board exam, pediatrics board review

In past years you had to wait until the most wonderful time of year was done before you

received that letter from the American Board of Pediatrics either congratulating you on

successfully passing the exam or a letter regretting to inform you that you unfortunately, didn't

pass the Boards. Well, it seems like now that the exam is electronically graded those letters

come before the holidays even have a chance to get rolling. We have heard those whoo hoo

celebratory shouts and those sighs of despair which means the results were sent out just before

the most wonderful time of the year.

For those of you who were congratulated we would like to second that. We want to especially

congratulate those who didn't pass the first time around, how much sweeter it must be to get

that letter.

For those of you who didn't pass, this is certainly not the time of the year to despair. It's the

most wonderful time of the year to persevere. However, persevere doesn't mean studying the

same way you did the first time. You must do something different.

If you are one of those who passed after taking the exam the second time around, you very

likely tried a new approach. Feel free to share your experience with those who are in the

position you were a year ago.

In fact, the 6th edition of Laughing Your Way to Passing the Pediatric Boards released last

October not only contains completely updated material, but we've also included a chapter

devoted to those of you taking the exam for the 2nd time. If you want to get started right now

you can start the most wonderful time of the year and not despair. Use the code persevere2015

to get an 20% discount to take the sting out.

Before the Ball Drops

on Friday, 20 November 2015. Posted in Pediatrics Recertification

For those of you with certificates that expire in 2015, hopefully you've already completed the requirements for the current MOC cycle.  If one of your requirements is completing Part 3, the cognitive expertise “secure exam”, this is one ball you don't want to drop.

You might have circled December 31st on your calendar as the day the ball is dropped from the roof of One Time Square .  But, if you wait until the 31st you will have dropped the ball on getting your certificate renewed.  You needed to circle November 30th at 3PM as the deadline for registering to take the exam at one of the prometric test sites.  That's 3PM Eastern Standard time for those of you living in Arizona refusing to set your clocks forward.  The deadline for taking the exam is actually December 15th. After that your ball turns into a pumpkin and you'll be searching for the lost glass slipper of recertification.

If you are one of those adrenaline junkies who are still watching the clock tick there is still time left to prepare.

For those of you wishing to use our material the bad news is we will not have a new edition of Surfing Your Way to Pediatric Recertification until early 2016. However, the good news is we have already released the brand new 6th edition of Laughing Your Way to Passing the Pediatric Boards this fall.  The updated material is the same material included in the soon to be released Surfing Your Way to Pediatric Recertification. The only difference is the first section that is focused on the initial certification exam.  

You may order the Laughing Your Way to Passing the Pediatric Boards 6th edition and we will include our Down to the Wire Guide to Passing the MOC e-book, which includes our guide and recommended step-by-step pathway for fulfilling the MOC requirement.  The e-book includes a pre-test diagnostic quiz to help you identify areas of weakness to focus on as the clock ticks towards December 15th.

Simply order the main text using the code DROPTHEBALL2015 to get the PDF download.  No need to drop the ball now.  Prepare for the secured exam so you can actually look forward to the ball dropping on new year's eve while looking forward to a fresh start in 2016 with your MOC in place. All without worrying about dropped balls and missing glass slipper.

MOC and Moca Just Take Me to Boca

on Wednesday, 18 November 2015.

If you've managed to navigate the MOC cycle, you're about to get ready for the “rinse and repeat as necessary” cycle. If you have actually read the emails from the ABP about the possible changes to the MOC process you are probably alone. 

I know that I for one stopped following the dizzying back and forth proposals, which is ironic since I'm actually in the business of helping you navigate the process.

I have also been ignoring the letters letting me know that in order to keep my MOC status current I must cross the bridge to the next cycle. But first, I must pay the $1,300 toll. That's a hefty toll and an easy one to postpone for more immediate needs like my home mortgage, car loan and food.

With the December deadline looming I'm finally getting ready to pay the hefty $1,300 MOC reenrollment entrance fee for the next cycle.  To prepare for this I finally began reading all the updates out there and apparently there is more changes coming and controversy with it in the forecast. The latest broo-ha-ha started with the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) recent decision to transition to a more relevant system. Yeah, I know many of you are asking, “What could be more relevant than tabulating a hand washing survey your patients fill out?”  Of course there are lots of ways to measure the quality of our work!   However, for now the ABP is sticking to the tried and irrelevant?

However, the American Board of Pediatrics has conceded that their ABIM brethren may be onto something and they are “studying“ other options. In fact, they are considering changing the MOC process to the more friendly MOCA process. Similar to the Starbucks moca latte, which comes in a more neutered red cup without distracting holiday / winter symbols. We will explore the extra A in MOCA in our next blog; as well as the changes implemented by the ABIM and other speciality boards and what you might expect in the future. In the meantime order yourself a moca latte in the inoffensive to some offensive to others neutral red cup and mumble to yourself, “I don’t care about MOCA, just take me to BOCA“ 


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